What Shows Up On A CLUE Report?

What is a CLUE report for auto insurance?

A CLUE report is a document that shows the seven-year history of loss associated with a person and a piece of property, such as a house or a car.

Insurers use a CLUE report to determine the risk of insuring that property..

What does clue mean in insurance?

Comprehensive Loss Underwriting ExchangeCLUE (Comprehensive Loss Underwriting Exchange)

Can I view my CLUE report online?

Thanks to the Fair Credit Reporting Act, you can get a free CLUE report for your home once a year from LexisNexis. Request your CLUE report online or by calling (866) 312-8076. There’s one catch: Only the owner of a property may access its CLUE report.

Can you look up insurance claims on a house?

While you may not have a clue about a home’s past insurance claims, your insurer certainly does. There are two major property claim databases that contain loss history reports, C.L.U.E. (Comprehensive Loss Underwriting Exchange) and A-PLUS (Automated Property Loss Underwriting System).

Do I have to tell new insurance about accident?

Yes – if you’ve been in an accident, you do have to tell your insurer. You should send your insurer a letter telling them what’s happened. But make it crystal clear that this is for ‘information only’ and you don’t wish to make a claim.

Do insurance companies know if you have had an accident?

Car insurance companies typically look at your motor vehicle record (MVR) when you apply for a new policy and every year around renewal time. Your MVR will include accidents that were reported to the state. For example, if police responded to the scene of an accident and filed a report, it will be included in the MVR.

Does a no fault accident go on your record?

A no-fault accident is a crash that you did not cause. Typically, no-fault accidents do appear on your driving record but will not likely impact your rate unless you have a history of accidents or if your insurance provider has to pay for damages.

Why do insurance companies use LexisNexis?

LexisNexis does not make credit decisions or determine insurance underwriting guidelines. LexisNexis’ role is to supply information to the insurance carriers, which the carriers can review in order to assist them in making an underwriting decision.

How do I find my CLUE report?

You can obtain your C.L.U.E report by calling LexisNexis Services at 1-866-312-8076. The personal reports section of the LexisNexis website also tells you how to order a copy of the report through the mail or, easiest of all, view the report online.

How far back does CLUE report go?

five yearsC.L.U.E. reports go back five years into the history of a property. It’s standard industry practice to purge losses over five years old.

How long does a insurance claim stay on your record?

three yearsIt is nice to know that filing a claim is not going to haunt you for life. In most states, car accidents and reported claims will fall off of your record after three years. In some states the drop off period is after five years.

Do I really need house insurance?

Turns out, homeowners insurance isn’t required by law. But just like buying sunscreen, it may help you avoid a helluva lot of trouble in the long term. Whether you’re thinking of buying a house, or you’re already in the process, homeowners insurance is definitely a term you’ll come across.

How do you fix a CLUE report?

How to fix your CLUE report. If you discover an error on your CLUE report, for example, an invalid claim report or an incorrect loss payment, you can contact LexisNexis directly by calling 888-497-0011 or 866-312-8076 and report the problem.

What does CLUE report mean?

Comprehensive Loss Underwriting ExchangeC.L.U.E. (Comprehensive Loss Underwriting Exchange) is a claims history database generated by LexisNexis® enabling insurance companies to access consumer claims information when they are underwriting or rating an insurance policy.

Do insurance companies share claims?

Do auto and homeowners insurance companies share my information about claims and policies? Yes. There are specialty consumer reporting agencies that collect information about the insurance claims you have made on your property and casualty insurance policies, such as your homeowners and auto policies.